Eyes Have It

  Always know what type of eye protection is required, and always use it as directed.

Always know what type of eye protection is required, and always use it as directed.


The Bureau of Labor Statistics noted that in 2015 there were more than 20,000 on-the-job eye injuries. Of those, 10 to 20% cause temporary or permanent vision loss in the injured employee. In fact, OSHA reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in lost productivity, medical treatment and worker compensation. This is an injury that with the proper PPE, could almost be eliminated. 

The American Optometric Association (AOA) states that workers experience eye injuries on the job for two major reasons: 

  1. They were not wearing eye protection. 
  2. They were wearing the wrong kind of protection for the job.

A Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of workers who suffered eye injuries revealed that nearly three out of five were not wearing eye protection at the time of the accident. These workers most often reported that they believed protection was not required for the situation.


We have seen a number of eye injures at Wachs Services. While we have been fortunate that no one has lost time, the injuries we've had have been quite painful nonetheless. Sitting across from a coworker who is having an instrument similar to a dremel with a burr bit, drilling into their eyeball to remove material, will put almost anyone on the edge of their seat.

There are three things you can do to help prevent an eye injury: 

  • Know the eye safety dangers at work.
  • Eliminate hazards before starting work by using machine guards, work screens or other engineering controls.
  • Always use proper eye protection. 
  • Your retinas perceive the outside world as upside-down –
    your brain flips the image for you.

  • Your peripheral vision is very low-resolution and is almost in black-and-white.

  • Got blue eyes? You share an ancestor with all other blue-eyed people across the world.

  • All humans originally had brown eyes. Blue eyes appeared as a mutation about 6,000 years ago


For more information on Eye Protection and Safety, please check out this week's edition of Wachs Weekly!